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Global Sep 14, 2016

USWNT set to face Thailand on Thursday in Columbus, Ohio

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USA vs. Thailand
MAPFRE Stadium; Columbus, Ohio
Sept. 15, 2016

(Via U.S. Soccer) – The U.S. Women’s National Team returns to the field on Sept. 15, to take on Thailand at MAPFRE Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. The USA’s first meeting with Thailand in the history of the programs will be broadcast on ESPN2 at 8 p.m. ET. The U.S. team will travel to Atlanta for the second match of a two-game set, taking on the Netherlands on Sept. 18 at the Georgia Dome in a match that will be broadcast on FS1 at 7p.m. 

FAMILIAR ROSTER COMES TO COLUMBUS: The U.S. roster for these two matches were in Brazil for the 2016 Olympics as U.S. head coach Jill Ellis will give these two games to those players. The call-ups may expand outside the Olympic Team for the remainder of the fall games. Ellis will suit up 18 players for both matches. There have been two changes to the U.S. roster from the 21 players that were originally named. Midfielder Morgan Brian took an elbow to the head in the Houston Dash’s NWSL match against the Boston Breakers on Sunday evening. She displayed concussion-like symptoms and has been ruled out of the Thailand match for precautionary reasons.

In addition, forward Mallory Pugh, who was already going to miss the match against Thailand due to training with the U-20 WNT in Los Angeles, will also miss the game against the Netherlands as she will stay with the U-20s for the U-20 Women’s NTC Invitational as she continues to fully recover from an ankle injury suffered during the Olympic Games.

U.S. Women’s National Team Roster by Position:
GOALKEEPERS (2):
18-Alyssa Naeher (Chicago Red Stars), 22- Ashlyn Harris (Orlando Pride)

DEFENDERS (7): 6-Whitney Engen (Boston Breakers), 8-Julie Johnston (Chicago Red Stars), 7-Meghan Klingenberg (Portland Thorns FC), 11-Ali Krieger (Washington Spirit), 5-Kelley O’Hara (Sky Blue FC), 4-Becky Sauerbrunn (FC Kansas City, 21- Emily Sonnett (Portland Thorns FC)

MIDFIELDERS (7): 17-Tobin Heath (Portland Thorns FC), 19-Lindsey Horan (Portland Thorns FC), 10-Carli Lloyd (Houston Dash), 3-Allie Long (Portland Thorns FC), 20-Samantha Mewis (Western New York Flash), 9-Heather O’Reilly (FC Kansas City), 15- Megan Rapinoe (Seattle Reign)

FORWARDS (3): 16-Crystal Dunn (Washington Spirit), 13-Alex Morgan (Orlando Pride), 12-Christen Press (Chicago Red Stars)

HAO SAYS GOODBYE: Heather O’Reilly, one of the most successful players in U.S. Women’s National Team history, announced her retirement from international soccer on Sept. 1.O’Reilly, 31, will end a spectacular 15-year international career when she plays her final game in a U.S. uniform against Thailand.She will be honored before the match and will wear the captain’s armband.O’Reilly began her career with the U.S. WNT as one of the youngest players to debut for the USA over the past 15 years, playing her first international match on the senior level at age 17 during the Algarve Cup against Sweden on March 1, 2002. She was a junior in high school. She would go on to play for five different head coaches for the National Team.She currently has 230 caps, which places her seventh all-time in U.S. Women’s National Team history. Her 46 goals place her 12th on the USA’s all-time scoring list, and her 54 assists are good for sixth place on the all-time assist list. With one more assist in her final game, she would tie Julie Foudy for fifth all-time. O’Reilly retires having played in three Women’s World Cup tournaments (2007, 2011, 2015), winning last year’s title; and three Olympic Games, winning three gold medals (2004, 2008, 2012), and accepted an alternate role at this summer’s Olympic Games.

YOUTH + EXPERIENCE: Fourteen of the 18 players on the USA’s Olympic roster were members of the 2015 Women’s World Cup championship team, and the four that weren’t – Crystal Dunn, Lindsey Horan, Mallory Pugh and Allie Long – now have cut their teeth at a world championship event. In addition, all four had played for the USA in one or more FIFA youth World Cups. The USA now heads into a new cycle working up to the next Women’s World Cup in France with a tremendously experienced core and U.S. head coach Jill Ellis and her staff will of course be looking to add new players during the process. Thirteen of the 19 players on this roster have 39 or more caps, but only five (not counting the retiring O’Reilly) have more than 100. Thirteen of the 19 players on the roster are under 30 with eight 27 or younger.

USA LOOKS TO STAY UNBEATEN IN REGULATION IN 2016: The USA is 16-0-3 in 2016 (the penalty kick loss in the Olympics officially counts as a tie), earning 14 shutouts while allowing just seven goals, five of those coming in two games, three against Japan on June 2 and two against Colombia on Aug. 9 in the Olympic Group G finale. The USA started the year with a 5-0 win against Ireland and then won two tournaments early on – taking the title at the CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Tournament in February and the SheBelieves Cup in March. The USA played two friendly matches against Olympic Group G opponent Colombia in April,winning 7-0 and 3-0 with seven different players scoring the 10 goals; and two entertaining matches against Japan in June, a wild 3-3 draw on June 2 in Commerce City, Colo., and a rematch in Cleveland that the USA won 2-0 during a game that was stopped in the 76th minute due to inclement weather. In July, the USA faced fellow Olympic participant South Africa on July 9 in the first meeting between the teams, winning just 1-0as the USA logged a dominating if somewhat uneven performance. The USA dominated Costa Rica in its final Olympic send-off match on July 22, winning 4-0 , and earned the full six points from its first two matches of the 2016 Olympics Games with a 2-0 win against New Zealand and a narrow 1-0 win vs. France. The USA picked up a point in its final first round match against Colombia to finish atop Group G and earn a quarterfinal meeting with Sweden, where the Americans dominated, out-shooting their opponents 27-6, but eventually fell in the shootout.

U.S. TEAM AND ROSTER NOTES:

  • With her goals in the first two games of the 2016 Olympics Games, Carli Lloyd became the only American to score multiple goals in three in separate Olympics (’08,’12,’16).
  • Lloyd scored her 90th international tally when she netted the game-winning goal against France on Aug. 6 in Belo Horizonte. She is now just 10 goals away from becoming the sixth player in U.S. history to score 100 or more.
  • Lloyd has 11 goals in 2016, tied for second-best on the team with Crystal Dunn and two behind team-leader Alex Morgan (13). Her eight Olympic goals put her in second place behind Abby Wambach’s U.S. record of 10 Olympic goals.
  • Lloyd has scored 27 goals in her last 30 matches starting with the Round of 16 game at the WWC. In fact, Lloyd has scored 36 international goals between the time she debuted six days’ shy of age 23, and when she turned 30. Remarkably, since she’s turned 30, she has scored 54 goals in just over four years.
  • Lloyd assisted on Dunn’s goal against Colombia on Aug. 9, her sixth assist of the year, also tied for second-best on the team with Tobin Heath and one behind team-leader Mallory Pugh (7).
  • Crystal Dunn and Mallory Pugh each notched a goal against Colombia on Aug. 9. It was the first Olympic goal for each player. Additionally, with that goal Pugh became the youngest American player to ever score at the Olympic Games. She also became the youngest American female player to start in an Olympic match when she took the field against New Zealand on Aug. 3.
  • Alex Morgan scored her team-leading 13th goal of 2016, 69th overall and sixth Olympic goal against Sweden on June 12 in the Olympic Quarterfinal. The only other time Morgan scored double-digit goals for the USA in a calendar year was in 2012 (28 goals), which also happened to be an Olympic year. Her six Olympic goals place her in sole possession of third place behind Lloyd (8) and Wambach (10) on the USA’s Olympic goals-scored list.
  • Morgan’s two goals on June 2 marked her 18th career multi-goal game.
  • OnJan. 23, Morgan became the 34th female player in U.S. history to play 100 times for her country. Morgan debuted for the USA on Oct. 2, 2010, vs. China. She’s averaged 0.59 goals per game in her international career.
  • Morgan’s goal 12 seconds into the match against Costa Rica on Feb. 10 was the earliest in U.S. WNT history. She also scored the latest goal in U.S. history, tallying after 122 and 22 seconds against Canada in the semifinal of the 2012 Olympics. It was also the quickest in CONCACAF qualifying history, besting Abby Wambach (35 seconds vs. Dominican Republic on Jan. 20, 2012).
  • Morgan scored three goals in the Olympic Qualifying semifinal match against Trinidad & Tobago on Feb. 19. It was her third career hat trick and the first since Nov. 28, 2012 against Ireland.
  • With her two assists in the 2016 Olympic Games, both coming on Lloyd’s goals, Tobin Heath upped her assist total to six in 2016 and 27 for her career with the WNT.
  • Heath scored her third goal of 2016, and 15th of her career, on a blistering volley against Colombia on April 6. Heath’s two goals in the February Olympic Qualifying tournament were her first since the Women’s World Cup Final and were remarkably similar, both coming off spinning left-footed blasts after making runs into the box from the right side and both coming off excellent and similar passes from Pugh who had made dynamic runs down the left side.
  • After having ACL surgery in mid-December of last year, midfielder Megan Rapinoe made a steady recovery, and her progress was good enough for Jill Ellis to name her to the 2016 Olympic Team.
  • On Aug. 9 against Colombia, Rapinoe was in the starting lineup for the first time since October of 2015. The game marked the first WNT action for Rapinoe since her knee surgery.
  • The match against New Zealand on Aug. 3 marked the first Olympic starts for Mallory Pugh, Morgan Brian, Becky Sauerbrunn, Julie Johnston and Meghan Klingenberg, while the match against France on Aug. 6 marked the first Olympic starts for Crystal Dunn and Whitney Engen. It was Engen’s debut at the Olympic Games and the first start in a senior level world championship for Dunn, Engen, Pugh and Long.
  • Coming in as second half subs on Aug. 3, Christen Press, Lindsey Horan and Dunn made their Olympic debuts against New Zealand. Ali Krieger came in as a sub on Aug. 6, thus making her Olympic debut as well. 10 of the 11 2016 Olympic debutants on the U.S. roster saw time on the field. Only goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher did not make her Olympic debut. Against Colombia on Aug. 9, Krieger, Horan and Press all made their first Olympic starts.
  • Pugh achieved a rare feat of helping two different teams qualify for a world championship in the same cycle. Last December, she captained the U.S. Under-20 Women’s National Team to a 2016 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup berth and the CONCACAF title at the qualifying tournament in Honduras. Pugh was called up by Jill Ellis for the USA’s January training camp this year, making her one of the youngest field players called into the full U.S. WNT in the past 15 years. Pugh was a starter at the age of 16 in the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Canada and will compete in the U-20 Women’s World Cup in Papua New Guinea at the end of this year.
  • Pugh scored in her senior team debut (the 19th U.S. WNT player to score in her first cap) on Jan. 23 vs. Ireland at 17 years, 8 months and 25 days old, becoming the youngest player to debut for the U.S. in the last 11 years.
  • Pugh earned her second cap with the WNT on Feb. 10, coming on for Dunn in the 68thminute against Costa Rica in her first Olympic qualifying match and thus became the youngest female player in WNT history to play in an Olympic Qualifying match at 17 years, 9 months and 12 days old.
  • Pugh earned her first start against Puerto Rico on Feb. 15 and picked up her first WNT assist while also creating a PR own goal. She has played in 17 of the USA’s 19 games this year and started 12 matches.
  • Pugh, who turned 18 on April 29, is fifth all-time for most U.S. caps before the age of 18 (11). She is third for most goals before the age of 18 (2), fourth in most starts before the age of 18 (7) and first for most assists before the age of 18 (5).
  • Before the match against Puerto Rico on Feb. 15 in the Olympic Qualifying tournament, Dunn had scored five goals for the U.S. WNT. She doubled that total vs. Puerto Rico, notching five goals to tie a U.S. record for most goals scored in a match. She became the seventh U.S. player to achieve that feat. The other six were: Brandi Chastain (1991), Michelle Akers (1991), Tiffeny Milbrett (2002), Abby Wambach (2004), Amy Rodriguez (2012) and Sydney Leroux (2012). It was Dunn’s first multi-goal game for the WNT.
  • After earning her first two caps at the 2013 Algarve Cup, now 22-year-old Lindsey Horan got her first three starts at the end of last year, switching positions to holding midfielder where she excelled in the Olympic Qualifying tournament and the SheBelieves Cup. Horan, who was the first American female player to skip college and head overseas to play professionally, left for Europe in July of 2012 after she graduated from high school and spent more than three years in France with Paris Saint-Germain. She scored her first WNT goal against T&T at the end of last year and scored her second to break open a tight match against Canada in the championship of Olympic Qualifying. Her third was one to remember, coming off the bench in her hometown of Denver on June 2 to head home an apparent game-winner in the 89th minute, but Japan equalized in the third minute of stoppage time.
  • Horan’s goal against Japan on June 2 was her second of 2016 and third of her career.
  • Midfielder Allie Long scored the first two goals of her international career on April 6 against Colombia. Long scored twice on headers. Her most recent start before that match was also at Pratt & Whitney Stadium, on June 19, 2014, in a 2-2 draw with France. She came off the bench on April 10 vs. Colombia to earn her sixth cap and started against Japan onJune 2 and June 5 to earn her seventh and eighth. Her start against South Africa on July 9gave her nine caps before she was named to the 2016 Olympic Team, the only field player on the team in single digits, but she hit 10 career caps on July 22 vs. Costa Rica. She now has 14 caps.
  • Christen Press has scored 34 international goals in 74 caps, moving her past Lindsay Tarpley into 16th place on the U.S. WNT all-time goals list. She is averaging just under a goal for every two games she plays (0.47 goals per game) for the WNT.
  • Julie Johnston’s two goals against Colombia on April 10 upped her career total to eight, all coming off set plays. It was her first multi-goal game for the USA.
  • Against Canada on Feb. 21 in the championship game of the Olympic Qualifying tournament, U.S. co-captain Becky Sauerbrunn became the 35th U.S. female player to reach 100 caps. She also picked up the third assist of her career, lofting a perfect pass to Lindsey Horan to score off a header. Sauebrunn got her second assist of the year and the fourth of her career on Lloyd’s header goal off a free-kick against Costa Rica on July 22.

IN THE RECORD BOOKS:

  • Carli Lloyd is in seventh place in the WNT’s all-time starts list with 197. Lloyd is the 10th woman in U.S. history to reach 200 caps, achieving the feat at the WWC quarterfinal match against China PR on June 26 and is in eighth place on the USA’s all-time caps with 228.
  • She also became the third player in U.S. history to score in her 200th appearance. Abby Wambach and Heather O’Reilly are the other two.
  • Lloyd is the highest active goal scorer in U.S. history with the players ahead of her, Mia Hamm, Abby Wambach, Kristine Lilly, Tiffeny Milbrett and Michelle Akers all retired.
  • With her assist against Colombia on Aug. 9, Lloyd moved into sole possession of ninth place on the U.S. all-time assist list with 43. She is in sixth place on the U.S. WNT’s all-time goal scoring list. Now with 90 goals, she is the highest-scoring midfielder in U.S. history.
  • Alex Morgan has 69 goals and is in eighth place on the USA’s all-time goal scoring list. Next in line is Cindy Parlow with 75 career goals.
  • Morgan Brian earned her 50th cap at the young age of 23 on March 6. Now with 58, she is 48th on the all-time caps list.
  • Kelley O’Hara sits at 38th on the all-time caps list with 86 to go along with her two international goals.
  • Against Colombia on Aug. 9, Ali Krieger earned her 93rd cap with the USA and is now seven away from becoming the 36th player in WNT history to reach the century mark.
  • The three goals for each team during the 3-3 draw on June 2 against Japan equaled the highest-scoring draw in USWNT history. It has occurred only three previous times, most recently vs. Germany in 2013.

USA IN NWSL: Following the Olympics, the U.S. players returned to their clubs to finish the NWSL season and several will see playoff action this year as Ali Krieger and Crystal Dunn of the Washington Spirit, Tobin Heath, Lindsey Horan, Emily Sonnett, Meghan Klingenberg and Allie Long of the Portland Thorns, and Alyssa Naeher, Christen Press and Julie Johnston of the Chicago Red Stars have all qualified for the post-season. Samantha Mewis and the Western New York Flash will be the fourth and final playoff team if they can earn a win or a draw in the final regular season game against Boston. Despite missing several games due to WNT commitments, several U.S. players are among the league leaders in several statistical categories. Press is sixth in the league in goals with seven while Tobin Heath leads the league in assists with nine. Dunn is fourth in assists with five. Press is second in the league in shots with 58 and first in shots on goal with 37. Morgan is sixth in the league in shots with 41 and ninth in shots on goal with 19. Mewis is 10th in the league in shots with 35. Ashlyn Harris is second in the league in saves with 60 while Naeher is sixth with 43. Naeher is tied for the league lead in shutouts with six with former U.S. WNT net-minder Nicole Barnhart.

2016 NWSL Regular Season Statistics Field Players

Player

GP

GS

M

G

A

SH

SOG

OFF

FC

FS

YC

Brian

14

14

911

0

0

6

2

2

5

11

0

Dunn

12

11

1052

1

5

29

12

11

8

25

0

Engen

13

13

1170

1

1

1

1

0

0

8

1

Heath

13

12

1068

1

9

31

17

6

25

27

2

Horan

14

14

1213

4

0

27

15

7

22

16

4

Johnston

11

11

990

0

0

1

0

0

5

4

1

Klingenberg

13

13

1170

0

0

4

2

2

6

7

1

Krieger

14

13

1177

1

0

6

2

1

5

3

2

Lloyd

6

6

463

4

3

23

9

7

6

4

0

Long

14

14

1260

4

2

26

12

3

19

27

0

S. Mewis

13

13

1170

4

2

35

16

0

22

13

1

Morgan

14

14

1260

4

2

41

19

10

6

19

1

O’Hara

11

10

943

1

1

24

7

7

8

14

1

O’Reilly

13

13

1120

0

2

28

12

9

12

13

2

Press

13

13

1170

7

0

58

37

14

13

6

0

Rapinoe

4

1

138

1

1

8

4

3

2

1

0

Sauerbrunn

13

13

1170

1

0

2

1

0

6

4

1

Sonnett

14

14

1260

0

0

2

1

0

4

2

2

2016 NWSL Regular Season Statistics Goalkeepers

Player

GP

GS

Min

GA

GAA

Sh

SOG

Sv

W

L

T

Harris

14

14

1260

18

1.29

163

78

60

5

8

1

Naeher

13

13

1170

13

1.00

129

57

43

6

3

4

BY THE NUMBERS:
0.37 Goals per game the USA allowed in 2016
1 USA’s FIFA ranking and number of players that made their WNT debut in 2016 (Pugh)
2 Times the USA has gone unbeaten in regulation time in a calendar year when playing 10 or more games
3.05 Goals per game the USA scored in 2016
6 Goals needed by Alex Morgan to catch Cindy Parlow (75) for 7th on the USA’s all-time scoring list
7 Caps Ali Krieger needs to become the 36th woman in U.S. history to reach 100 caps
11 Number of different U.S. players to score a goal in 2016
10 Goals Carli Lloyd needs to reach 100
99 Minutes on the field per goal averaged by Abby Wambach in her career
101 Minutes on the field per goal averaged by Alex Morgan in her career
130 Minutes on the field per goal averaged by Mia Hamm in her career

JILL ELLIS FACT FILE : After leading the USA to the Women’s World Cup title, U.S. head coach Jill Ellis was rewarded with a multi-year contract extension on Aug. 5, 2015. She is the third U.S. coach – and first female American coach — to win a Women’s World Cup at the senior level, following Anson Dorrance (1991) and Tony DiCicco (1999). Ellis was named the 2015 FIFA World Coach of the Year for Women’s Soccer on Jan. 11, 2016, at the FIFA Awards Gala in Zurich, Switzerland. She was also named the CONCACAF Female Coach of the Year. Ellis, who previously served two stints as interim head coach of the U.S. WNT, is the eighth official head coach in U.S. history. She coached seven games as interim coach in 2012 (5-0-2) and two games (1-0-1) as interim in 2014 before she officially came on board, which gave her a 6-0-3 record before she ever was formally named the head coach in May of 2014. She has gone 46-3-10 since then for an overall record of 52-3-13, earning her 50th career WNT win on July 22 vs. Costa Rica. Since taking over as head coach, Ellis has won four tournaments: the 2015 Algarve Cup, the 2015 Women’s World Cup, the 2016 CONCACAF Women’s Olympic Qualifying Championship and the 2016 SheBelieves Cup. After an early exit from the 2016 Olympics, Ellis will now start focusing on building a team to qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup,

  • Prior to becoming head coach, Ellis had extensive experience in the U.S. Women’s National Team programs having served as an assistant coach for the U.S. Women’s National Team under Pia Sundhage, helping the team to a gold medal at the 2008 Olympics. She has served two stints as head coach of the U.S. Under-20 Women’s National Team, guiding the squad to the CONCACAF title in 2010 and to the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Germany.
  • Ellis also had two stints as the head coach of the U.S. Under-21 Women’s National Team, the second starting in the middle of 2005, after which she guided the team to the Nordic Cup in Sweden. She also coached the U-21s to the Nordic Cup title in Germany in 2000.
  • Ellis was a scout for the USA at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, and has served as an assistant coach with the U.S. U-21s and U-16 Girls’ National Teams.
  • Ellis joined U.S. Soccer full-time after a highly successful 12-year run as the head women’s soccer coach for the UCLA Bruins. Ellis led UCLA to eight NCAA Final Fours, including seven in a row from 2003-2009, and won six straight conference titles from 2003-2008. She finished her time in Westwood with a record of 229-45-14. Ellis, who was also head coach at the University of Illinois, has an all-time collegiate coaching record of 248-63-14.
  • She was the 2000 NSCAA National Coach of the Year after leading the Bruins to the NCAA Final in just her second season as head coach.
  • Ellis arrived in Westwood after heading the University of Illinois women’s soccer program for two years. In 1998, she brought the Fighting Illini to a 12-8 record and a first Big Ten Tournament berth. Prior to coaching at Illinois, Ellis served as an assistant coach at the University of Virginia for one year (1996-97), at Maryland for three years (1994-96) and at North Carolina State for another three years (1988-90). As an assistant coach at North Carolina State, Ellis helped the Wolfpack secure the 1988 ACC title and an NCAA Final Four appearance.
  • A forward during her playing days at the College of William & Mary from 1984-87, Ellis was a Third-Team All-American in 1987. In 1984, Ellis helped Braddock Road in Virginia to the Under-19 club national championship.
  • Ellis was the keynote speaker at the 2016 commencement exercises at William & Mary. Her theme for the speech: “Be bold.”
  • Ellis grew up in Portsmouth, England, and came to the United States in 1981 at the age of 15. She also lived in Singapore for two years while her father helped to develop a national soccer program in that country. She earned her B.A. in English Literature and Composition from the College of William & Mary in 1988 and currently resides in Miami. She has a USSF “A” coaching license.

AT MAPFRE STADIUM: The U.S. WNT has a long history at MAPFRE Stadium, formerly Columbus Crew Stadium, having first played there in October of 1999 after the Women’s World Cup. The USA also played a Women’s World Cup match there in 2003, defeating North Korea, 3-0, as Cat Whitehill scored twice, becoming the only defender in U.S. history to score twice in a World Cup match. The WNT’s most recent game at MAPFRE Stadium was in October of 2013, a 1-1 draw with New Zealand.

IN FOCUS: THAILAND

FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION OF THAILAND
FIFA World Ranking: 32
AFC Ranking: 6
World Cup Appearances: 1 (2015)
Best Olympic Qualifying finish: Group Play (2015)
Record vs. USA: 0-0-0
Head Coach: Spencer Prior

Thailand Women’s National Team Roster by Position:
GOALKEEPERS (2):
1-Waraporn Boonsing, 19-Miranda Nild

DEFENDERS (8 ): 2-Kanjanaporn Saenkhun, 3-Natthakarn Chinwong, 4-Duangnapa Sritala, 5-Ainon Phancha, 9-Warunee Phetwiset, 10-Sunisa Srangthaisong, 16-Khwanruedee Saengchan, 17-Anootsara Maijarern, 18-Yada Sengyong

MIDFIELDERS (5 ): 6-Pikul Khueanpet, 8-Naphat Seesraum, 11-Alisa Rukpinij, 12-Rattikan Thongsombut, 21-Kanjana Sung-ngoen

FORWARDS (6): 7-Silawan Intamee, 13-Orathai Srimanee, 14-Thanatta Chawong, 15-Pitsamai Sornsai, 20-Wilaiporn Boothduang, 23-Nisa Romyen

THAILAND NOTES:

  • Thailand participated in its first Women’s World Cup at the senior level in 2015 in Canada. Thailand qualified by finishing fifth in the Asian qualifying tournament to grab the last spot in a tournament that did not feature North Korea which had been banned from the World Cup due to several players testing positive for banned substances at the 2011 Women’s World Cup.
  • Thailand put in a respectable World Cup performance, falling 4-0 to long-time power Norway before picking up its first win in a FIFA competition with a 3-2 victory against Ivory Coast. Thailand then fell 4-0 to then world No. 1 Germany and bowed out of the tournament with distinction.
  • Thailand’s historic victory against the Ivory Coast featured two goals from Orathai Srimanee and one from Thanatta Chawong. Both players are on the roster to face the USA.
  • Thailand head coach Spencer Prior is a former professional player in his home country of England where he played for seven different clubs, including stints with Leicester City and Manchester City. He played more than 500 matches after various levels of English soccer.
  • Near the very end of his career, Prior moved to Australia and was the assistant coach for the Matildas under former U.S. head coach Tom Sermanni from 2011-2013 and head coach of the Australia U-20 WNT from 2012-2013.
  • Thailand hosted the 2004 FIFA U-19 Women’s World Cup (which was the last FIFA women’s tournament held at the U-19 level before it moved to U-20s in 2006). The USA finished third in that tournament, which was won by Germany. Thailand, which was in a difficult group with Germany, Canada and Australia, lost all three games by an 18-0 margin.
  • Becky Sauerbrunn, Ashlyn Harris and Angie Woznuk made the All-Tournament Team in that World Cup. Woznuk won the Silver Ball and the Bronze Show in that tournament.

USA VS. THAILAND

  • This will mark the first meeting between the USA and Thailand, and the match itself is representative of the growth of the women’s game worldwide.
  • Thailand marks the 50th different country the USA has played in its history, which began in 1985 when the USA played its first international match.
  • Thailand will be the 8th country from the Asia Football Confederation that the USA has played after Australia (which the Americans faced many times when they were a part of the Oceania Confederation), China PR, Chinese Taipei, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and Taiwan.

LAST TIME…

On the field for the USA:

August 12, 2016 – Mane Garrincha Stadium; Brasilia, Brazil
2016 Olympics – Quarterfinal

Scoring Summary: 1              2              ET1         ET2         F          PKs
USA                        0              1              0             0             1          3
SWE                       0              1              0             0             1          4

SWE – Stina Blackstenius (Lisa Dahlkvist)             61st minute
USA – Alex Morgan                                               77

Penalty Summary:
USA – Alex Morgan (save), Lindsey Horan (goal), Carli Lloyd (goal), Morgan Brian (goal), Christen Press (miss)
SWE – Lotta Schelin (goal), Kosovare Asllani (goal), Linda Sembrant (save), Caroline Seger (goal), Lisa Dahlkvist (goal)

Lineups:
USA: 1-Hope Solo; 5-Kelley O’Hara (15-Megan Rapinoe, 72 (12-Christen Press, 99)), 8-Julie Johnston, 4-Becky Sauerbrunn, 7-Meghan Klingenberg; 3-Allie Long (16-Crystal Dunn, 65), 14-Morgan Brian, 10-Carli Lloyd (capt.); 17-Tobin Heath, 13-Alex Morgan, 2-Mallory Pugh (9-Lindsey Horan, 114)
Subs not used: 6-Whitney Engen, 11-Ali Krieger, 18-Alyssa Naeher
Head Coach: Jill Ellis

SWE: 1-Hedvig Lindahl; 15-Jessica Samuelsson (4-Emma Berglund, 119), 5-Nilla Fischer, 3-Linda Sembrant, 16-Elin Rubensson (6-Magdalena Eriksson, 71); 9-Kosovare Asllani, 7-Lisa Dahlkvist, 17-Caroline Seger (capt.); 10-Sofia Jakobsson (12-Olivia Schough, 91), 13-Fridolina Rolfo (11-Stina Blackstenius, 18), 8-Lotta Schelin
Subs not used: 2-Jonna Andersson, 14-Emilia Appelqvist, 18-Hilda Carlen
Head Coach:
Pia Sundhage

Featured Players

Forward, Midfielder
Goalkeeper
Midfielder, Forward
Defender, Midfielder
See Commitment List